Lois Lane: Fallout. A novel by Gwenda Bond. What?!

Lois Lane: Fallout by Gwenda Bona

 

When did DC Comics get into Young Adult Fiction? Am I late to the party again? It doesn’t matter because it’s a fantastic idea!

I’ve never been much of a Lois Lane fan. She always seemed one-dimensional to me — just all about the story rah-rah-rah and always needed to be saved by Superman. Can we please erase the Henry Cavill Superman movie Man of Steel (2013) from our brains, please? Just bringing that up gives me the shivers.

Anyhow, I gave a couple pages of Lois Lane: Fallout by Gwenda Bond a try and before you know it I was hooked. I kept turning the pages and didn’t stop until 2AM when I finished it.

Lois Lane is still all about the story but she’s more fleshed out. There’s a reason why she’s so dogged — her upbringing as an army brat and making things right with her friends. She’s plucky and strong. She doesn’t need saving…just help sometimes.

And Superman? Oh, he’s in there but we never get to actually meet him even though he’s a significant part of Lois’ life. I love how he’s weaved into the story.

Lois Lane is starting a new life in Metropolis. An Army brat, Lois has lived all over—and seen all kinds of things. (Some of them defy explanation, like the near-disaster she witnessed in Kansas in the middle of one night.) But now her family is putting down roots in the big city, and Lois is determined to fit in. Stay quiet. Fly straight.

 

As soon as she steps into her new high school, though, she can see it won’t be that easy. A group known as the Warheads is making life miserable for another girl at school. They’re messing with her mind, somehow, via the high-tech immersive videogame they all play. Not cool. Armed with her wit and her new snazzy job as a reporter, Lois has her sights set on solving this mystery. But sometimes it’s all a bit much. Thank goodness for her maybe-more-than-a friend, a guy she knows only by his screenname, SmallvilleGuy…READ MORE

I can’t wait to find other DC Comics and Marvel Comics novels. Word on the street is that there will be a Black Widow novel coming out in Oct 2015 called Forever Red! I will be for sure all on that!

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It’s About Comics, Music, and Love. Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell

Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell

This is not a comic book or graphic novel but the references to X-Men, Batman, and Watchmen are enough for me to consider this in my “On Comics and Such” category 🙂

Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell has been on my radar for quite some time now. It was the cover art that initially hooked me in — the simple illustration and the type. At first, I thought it was a graphic novel.

Yesterday while I was returning a stack of books to the library, I saw Eleanor & Park as one of their featured titles and I grabbed it. I was just going to check out a few pages, but then I got completely sucked in. I couldn’t put it down. Usually, when I’m speed-reading, I gloss over words and sometimes pages. But, not with this one. I wanted to read every single word written on the page.

Six hours later, I was, like, damn. I haven’t read a book that made me so happy, gave me butterflies in the stomach, and brought tears to my eyes in so long. Plus, it brought me back to my high school years that were also filled with cassette tapes, Esprit bags, waiting for telephone calls, and that one crazy crush.

Set over one school year in 1986, Eleanor & Park is the story of two star-crossed misfits – smart enough to know first love almost never lasts, but brave and desperate enough to try.

Some of my favorite quotes:

  • “The new girl’s eyes were darker than his mom’s, really dark, almost like holes in her face. That made it sound bad, but it wasn’t. It might even be the best thing about her. It kind of reminded Park of the way artists draw Jean Grey sometimes when she’s using her telepathy, with her eyes all blacked out and alien.”
  • “Paul was the one who’d taught Eleanor to say Asian and not oriental. ‘Oriental’s for food,’ he’d said.”
  • “‘I don’t like you,’ he said. ‘I need you.'”

I am now a Rainbow Rowell fan and can’t wait to read her other books.

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Nimona. “We’re Villains! Villains kill people sometimes!”

Nimona  by Noelle Stevenson

Nimona has been on my to-read list for quite some time. I’d been hearing great things about it and I really liked the artwork. So, while I was noodling at the library the other day, I saw it as a featured read and I quickly grabbed it.

I absolutely loved it. The artwork is wonderful, the dynamics between all the characters are so well developed, and it’s a story/plot that I’ve never read before..truly refreshing.

Nimona is an impulsive young shapeshifter with a knack for villainy. Lord Ballister Blackheart is a villain with a vendetta. As sidekick and supervillain, Nimona and Lord Blackheart are about to wreak some serious havoc. Their mission: prove to the kingdom that Sir Ambrosius Goldenloin and his buddies at the Institution of Law Enforcement and Heroics aren’t the heroes everyone thinks they are.

But as small acts of mischief escalate into a vicious battle, Lord Blackheart realizes that Nimona’s powers are as murky and mysterious as her past. And her unpredictable wild side might be more dangerous than he is willing to admit.

My favorite quote?

We’re Villains! Villains kill people sometimes! ~Nimona

It’s such a boss quote and Nimona is so boss!

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Gene Luen Yang Announces New Boxers and Saints Graphic Novels

One of my favorite graphic novelists ever, Gene Yuen Lang, has just announced exclusively with Wired.com his latest project Boxers and Saints. You can check out a 10-page excerpt of it over at Wired — suhweet!

Now, Yang announces his latest graphic novel project, Boxers & Saints, exclusively at Wired.com. Due out this September from First Second Books, the slipcased edition will contain two volumes that explore the stories of two peasants during the Boxer Rebellion in China who struggle with issues of identity during a time in Chinese history when many were asked to choose between their country and their faith. While Boxers tells the story of a peasant who joins the Rebellion, Saints follows the spiritual journey of a Chinese woman who converts to Catholicism.

I just appreciate what an amazing story-teller/artist he is. And reading more about how he started, inspires me to get my ass off the couch…or something to that effect 🙂

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Cursed Pirate Girl by Jeremy Bastian Is Frackin’ Awesome

Cursed Pirate Girl cover by Jeremy Bastian

My latest read and most amazing discovery? Cursed Pirate Girl by Jeremy Bastian.

This epic graphic novel has been around for the past several years — how could I not have known about it before?!?! It wasn’t until the other weekend when I was noodling around the comic book shop that I learned about Cursed Pirate Girl. It was one of the featured books on display.

I picked it up because it looked amazing. A badass girl with an eye patch on the cover? Fierce. And then, I opened the book…

Holy shit.

The illustrations are frackin’ phenomenal.

It’s so very rare to see good black and white artwork in graphic novels. Usually, the balance is so far off where there’s too much black or too much white that it hurts the eyes. But here, I couldn’t get enough of Bastian’s work. His inking and line work technique are exceptional — creating tones of gray even in the night scenes where black is the primary color.

My eyes were overwhelmed in a good way. I wanted to see every single detail — I still do (I’m going to re-read the book but re-read the artwork this time).

crazy,  magical illustrations & textured, frayed paper

Flipping through the pages, you feel as though you’re being transported to another world — think The NeverEnding Story / Alice in Wonderland as drawn by Sir John Tenniel / Peter Pan. The story itself is so well told. A parrot in a fish? Yeah, I believe that. Why wouldn’t I? Of course! Brilliant.

And what I appreciated most? That the Cursed Pirate Girl is so fearless. She can kick your ass if she wanted to. She found out she was missing her eye (I won’t reveal how) and what does she do? She just finds something to cover it. No biggie.

If I had a daughter, this would be tops for bedtime story/required reading.

I am so blown away.

Thank you, Jeremy Bastian for the inspiration and magic!

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End O’ December Reading List

Can you believe that I still haven’t gotten to these treasures yet? Oiy, what am I doing?!

Anyhow, there are only 5 or so days left in the year…1 or 2 if you believe the Mayan end-of-the-world prediction. So with what little time that’s left either way, I’m hoping that I can power through these:

What’s the rush? The fact that there are a couple Derek Kirk Kim books I want to get at 🙂

So, here’s to getting lost and inspired, especially with the nutshit craziness of the holidays — I mean, I <3 Christmas, but I also hate it at the same time. I mean, Christmas would be perfect if it were exactly like Thanksgiving, but still with the mistletoe, tree, Christmas movie specials, and music…oh, and snow.

*sigh*

If only I ruled the world.

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Lucky Peach Magazine, Issue 5: Chinatown

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It was a fun-filled weekend and I acquired a LOT of new material to work with. You hang out with a bunch of guys and you’re bound to get “inspired.” With that being said, the usual comic slated for today will be arriving tomorrow instead.
BUT, I do have an amazing find to share with you all — Lucky Peach magazine!
I tell you that it was fate that brought this magazine to me. Thanks to the Yume Wo Katare ramen line, Mr. Lee and I were given the chance to noodle around Porter Square Books, an indie bookshop I’d never visited before (what?!). I spotted the Chinatown cover and started leafing through the sucker. So, basically…

Lucky Peach is a quarterly journal of food and writing. Each issue focuses on a single theme, and explores that theme through essays, art, photography, and recipes.

This particular issue was all about Chinese food.
It’s got some seriously awesome articles and isn’t your typical food periodical — it’s fun and isn’t overly focused on recipes, entertaining, gadget reviews and/or how-to do something food-related. It’s more about the places, back-stories, and people behind the food. Those are the parts that interest me the most. Plus, I already know that I’m a shiyat cook — I generally just roast vegetables, make scrambled eggs, and re-heat things. That is my repertoire.
My favorite articles so far from the issue?
  • photo compilation of how chow mein looks around the world. Like, Mozambique serves chow mein? Really? Really. I love stuff like this. When Mr. Lee and I were in the Bahamas a few years back, we wanted to see what Bahamian Chinese fast food was like. FYI it sucked.
  • behind-the-scenes look into the Asian produce world — from the farmers to how it gets into the supermarkets and then sold.
  • a rant on walnut prawns — which, by the way, I <3 eating as filthy and as disgusting it may be prepared.
I can’t wait to read about other food in upcoming issues. At $12 a pop, it is a bit steep, but considering that I don’t subscribe to anything else, I’ll afford meself this small luxury.
Check it out if you can — it’s published by McSweeney’s, a publishing company based in San Francisco, CA.
PS. Does anyone else hate themselves after eating at Yume Wo Katare? I like my pork fat but jeezus kriste.
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